(2561) Prediction of subjective affective state from brain activations.   Rolls ET, Grabenhorst F and Franco L.   2009.   Journal of Neurophysiology, volume 101, pages 1294-1308.   The change in tense from past to present reflects a change from warm and cold stimuli to visual stimuli, which change might contribute to any observed difference in responses.

(2562) Short-term temporal discounting of reward value in human ventral striatum.   Gregorios-Pippas L, Tobler PN and Schultz W.   2009.   Journal of Neurophysiology, volume 101, pages 1507-1523.

(2563) MRC trial of treatment of mild hypertension: principal results.   Medical Research Council Working Party.   1985.   British Medical Journal, volume 291, pages 97-104.    Comment. Robinson M.   British Medical Journal, volume 291, page 347.    Author reply, page 347.

(2564) Not all in the brain.   Book Review.   Tallis R.   2007.   Brain, volume 130, pages 3050-3054.   "The difference between the underpinning mechanisms and the conscious action guided by a sustained explicit purpose cannot be captured in physiological terms. ... Invoking activity in more of, or different places in, the brain, does not deliver this difference."   Oh yes it does, through the sequence with which different places in the brain are activated. When the reviewer, by his own account, heads purposefully off to the pub' to meet someone in order to persuade them to collaborate with him on a research project, the places in the reviewer's brain that drive his muscles may become active before the places in the reviewer's brain that form a sustained explicit purpose, possibly reflecting the reviewer's choice of the pub' for a meeting which might be expected to occur in a more confidential setting. Compare that sequence with the activation of the places in the reviewer's brain that drive his muscles after the activation of the places in the reviewer's brain that form a sustained explicit purpose. All that is needed to expose the reviewer's italics as wishful is the acceptance that the difference between these two sequences warrants exploration, and that such a difference is made accessible through brain imaging, by...invoking activity in more of, or different places in, the brain... . Thus, to what degree does the reviewer's sustained explicit purpose reflect a wish for personal aggrandizement, beginning with activity in the reviewer's instinctual brain, for example the amygdalae, and to what degree does the reviewer's sustained explicit purpose reflect the deferment necessary for genuine collaboration, inclusive of activation of those parts of the reviewer's brain that reflect his appreciation of how he is seen through the eyes of the person he heads off purposefully to meet in the pub', for example the medial frontal cerebral cortices?

(2565) Phasic voluntary movements reverse the aftereffects of subsequent theta-burst stimulation in humans.   Iezzi E, Conte A, Suppa A, Agostino R, Dinapoli L, Scontrini A and Berardelli A.   2008.   Journal of Neurophysiology, volume 100, pages 2070-2076.

(2566) Evidence for a frontoparietal control system revealed by intrinsic functional connectivity.   Vincent JL, Kahn I, Snyder AZ, Raichle ME and Buckner RL.   2008.   Journal of Neurophysiology, volume 100, pages 3328-3342.

(2567) Efficacy and safety of pregabalin in elderly people with generalised anxiety disorder.   Montgomery S, Chatamra K, Pauer L, Whalen E and Baldinetti F.   2008.   British Journal of Psychiatry, volume 193, pages 389-394.

(2568) Olanzapine for the treatment of borderline personality disorder: variable dose 12-week randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study.   Schulz SC, Zanarini MC, Bateman A, Bohus M, Detke HC, Trzaskoma Q, Tanaka Y, Lin D, Deberdt W and Corya S.   2008.   British Journal of Psychiatry, volume 193, pages 485-492.

(2569) The neural correlates of intending not to do something.   Kühn S, Gevers W and Brass M.   2009.   Journal of Neurophysiology, volume 101, pages 1913-1920.

(2570) Behavioral triggers of skin conductance responses and their neural correlates in the primate amygdala.   Laine CM, Spitler KM, Mosher CP and Gothard KM.   2009.   Journal of Neurophysiology, volume 101, pages 1749-1754.