(2701) Functional properties of human primary motor cortex gamma oscillations.   Muthukumaraswamy SD.   2010.   Journal of Neurophysiology, volume 104, pages 2873-2885.

(2702) Common synaptic input to the human hypoglossal motor nucleus.   Laine CM and Bailey EF.   2011.   Journal of Neurophysiology, volume 105, pages 380-387.

(2703) Brothers delay menarche and the onset of sexual activity in their sisters.   Milne FH and Judge DS.   2011.   Proceedings. Biological Sciences / The Royal Society, volume 278, pages 417-423.

(2704) The evolution of punishment through reputation.   dos Santos M, Rankin DJ and Wedekind C.   2011.   Proceedings. Biological Sciences / The Royal Society, volume 278, pages 371-377.

(2705) A Bayesian phylogenetic approach to estimating the stability of linguistic features and the genetic biasing of tone.   Dediu D.   2011.   Proceedings. Biological Sciences / The Royal Society, volume 278, pages 474-479.

(2706) Evidence for the stress-linked immunocompetence handicap hypothesis in human male faces.   Moore FR, Cornwell RE, Smith MJ, Al Dujaili EA, Sharp M and Perrett DI.   2011.   Proceedings. Biological Sciences / The Royal Society, volume 278, pages 774-780.

(2707) Brains, lifestyles and cognition: are there general trends?   Lefebvre L and Sol D.   2008.   Brain, Behavior and Evolution, volume 72, pages 135-144.
     With reference to consistent language, on page 136, Lefebvre and Sol state that: "If New Caledonian crows are unique in their tool use, they are also part of the most innovative genus of the entire class Aves [Lefebvre et al., 1997a], as well as the genus that has the highest tool use count [Lefebvre et al., 2002].". Uniqueness is incomparable, so that the superlative "highest" is meaningless, because this is the only genus that has a tool use count. On page 137 Lefebvre and Sol state that: "At the individual level, Bouchard et al. [2007] have found that latency of social learning is positively correlated with innovative problem-solving in pigeons, even after the common correlate of neophobia has been removed from the two measures." Latency is the delay between a stimulus and a response, so that as the delay in social learning increased, so too did innovative problem-solving. As indicated in (2708), Bouchard, Goodyer and Lefebvre showed: "...positive correlation between innovation and social learning...". Also, on page 137, Lefebvre and Sol state that: "Positive correlations across individuals are a common feature of cognitive test batteries run on humans as well as outbred rodents [Plomin, 2001]. All these lines of evidence suggest that some of the variation in cognition between individuals and species reflects a general process.". Really. Variation usually reflects the lack of a general process. On page 139, Levebvre and Sol state that: "Absolute size of the cortex is also a good predictor of rates of social deception [Byrne and Corp, 2004], innovation, tool use and social learning [Reader and Laland, 2002].", but the study by Byrne and Corp was of the neocortex, not of the cortex (2709).
     With reference to ellipsis, on page 136, Lefebvre and Sol state that: "Falsifiable predictions can then be made on the indices, for example that they are all positively correlated or that the size of certain brain areas is larger in taxa that have higher counts of innovation, tool use, deception and/or social learning.". Are the authors saying that deception and social learning can be mutually exclusive variables? Yes/no. On page 137, Lefebvre and Sol state that: "Negative correlations would suggest trade-offs, such that enhancement of one type of cognition and/or memory is costly and requires a decrease in other types of cognition [Sherry and Schacter, 1987].". Are the authors saying that cognition and memory can be mutually exclusive variables? Yes/no. On page 138, Lefebvre and Sol state that: "It is only when measures such as executive brain ratio (volume of pallial areas/brainstem) are used that the similarity between primates and birds breaks down: interspecific variance in executive ratio is well-predicted by absolute size of the brain (89%), but not by residual size (21%).". The similarity appears to be in comparisons between species within the class of birds, and between species within the order of primates, so do the figures refer to birds or to primates?
     With reference to omission, Yu and Margoliash [1996] on page 139 do not appear in the reference section.

(2708) Social learning and innovation are positively correlated in pigeons (Columba livia).   Bouchard J, Goodyer W and Lefebvre L.   2007.   Animal Cognition, volume 10, pages 259-266.

(2709) Neocortex size predicts deception rate in primates.   Byrne RW and Corp N.   2004.   Proceedings. Biological Sciences / The Royal Society, volume 278, pages 1693-1699.

(2710) Integration of visual and tactile signals from the hand in the human brain: an FMRI study.   Gentile G, Petkova VI and Ehrsson HH.   2011.   Journal of Neurophysiology, volume 105, pages 910-922.